Childcare & Development References | First Discoverers

Childcare & Development References

The Science of Childcare Series: 5 Senses to Stimulate

References:

  1. http://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/sep/23/half-children-reception-unready-school
  2. Donaldson, M., Children’s Minds. Fontana, 1987

The Science of Childcare Series: Linguistic Development

References:

  1. Fontana, D. (1988) Psychology for Teachers. London: Macmillan.
  2. Skinner, B.F. (1957). Verbal Behaviour. Acton, MA: Copley Publishing Group.
  3. Chomsky, N. (1965). Aspects of the Theory of Syntax. MIT Press.
  4. Shaffer, D.R. (1993). Developmental Psychology: Childhood and adolescence. Pacific Grove CA: Brooks/Cole.
  5. Braine, M.D.S. (1963). The ontogeny of English phrase structure: The first phase. Language, 39.
  6. http://www.literacytrust.org.uk
  7. http://www.totthoughts.com

The Science of Childcare Series: Social & Emotional Development

References:

  1. Bowlby, J. (1980). Attachment and Loss, Vol. 3: Loss: Sadness and Depression.New York:Basic Books.
  2. Bandura, A. (1977). Social Learning Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  3. Vygotsky, L.S. (1981). The genesis of higher mental functions. In J.V. Wertsch (Ed.), The concept of activity in Soviet psychology. Armonk, NY: Sharpe.
  4. Erikson, E.H. (1959). Identity and life styles: Selected papers. New York: International Universities Press.
  5. PBS Parents: Developing and Cultivating Skills Through Sensory Play –http://www.pbs.org/parents/child-development/sensory-play/developing-and-cultivating-skills-through-sensory-play/
  6. Scholastic: Social Development in 0-2 year-olds –http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/social-development-0-2-year-olds
  7. Supporting Teaching and Learning in Schools –http://www.homelearningcollege.com/docs/default-source/course-contents/ncfe-level-2-supporting-teaching-and-learning-sample.pdf?sfvrsn=2
  8. Social and Emotional Aspects of Development –http://www.foundationyears.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/SEAD_Guidance_For_Practioners.pdf

The Science of Childcare Series: Physical Development

References:

  1. Canadian Council on Learning (2006) Let the Children Play: Nature’s Answer to Early Learning, Lessons in Learning. Ottawa: CCL.
  2. Buhler, C. (1935) From Birth to Maturity. London: Kegan Paul.
  3. Piaget, J. (1955) The Child’s Construction of Reality. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  4. Cleland, F., & Gallahue, D. (1993). Young children’s divergent movement ability. Article in: ‘Perceptual and Motor Skills’ 77.
  5. Henniger, M.L. (2012) Teaching Young Children: An Introduction. Pearson.
  6. Montessori, M. (1967). The absorbent mind. New York.
  7. Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF), corp creator. (2009) Learning, playing and interacting: good practice in the Early Years Foundation Stage.
  8. Fisher, K., Hirsh-Pasek, K., Golinkoff, R.M., & Glick Gryfe, S. (2008). Conceptual split? Parents’ and experts’ perceptions of play in the 21st century. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology: 29.
  9. ‘Learning Through Physical Play’ – an excellent summary.
  10.  ‘Physical Activity and Motor Development’ – useful information and ideas for parents and childcare professionals.

The Science of Childcare Series: Creative Development

References:

  1. Gardner, Howard (1983; 1993) Frames of Mind: The theory of multiple intelligences, New York: Basic Books.
  2. Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (2000). Curriculum Guidance for the Foundation Stage. London: QCA.
  3. Robinson Report. Great Britain. Department for education and Employment. Department for culture, Media and sport. National advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education (1999). All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education. London: DfEE.
  4. Torrance, E. P. (1972) ‘Can we teach children to think creatively?’, Journal of Creative Behaviour, 8 (2)
  5. Greenspan, S. et al, (1997) The Growth of the Mind and the Endangered Origins of Intelligence. Addison Wesley, Reading, MA.
  6. Malaguzzi, L. (1993). ‘History, ideas, and basic philosophy: an interview with Lella Gandini.’ In: Edwards, C., Gandini, L. and Forman, G. (Eds) The Hundred Languages of Children: The Reggio Emilia Approach – Advanced Reflections. Second edn. Greenwich, CT: Ablex Publishing.
  7. Sacks, O. (2007) Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain. Knopf.
  8. Sharp, C. (2004) ‘Developing young children’s creativity: what can we learn from research?’ Topic, Issue 32. National Federation of Educational Research. 

Early Years Childcare Studies in the UK

References:

  1. Cohen, L. and Mannion, L., Research Methods in Education. Routledge, London. 1980.
  1. DfE: Early Years Evidence 
  1. Effects of early childcare on cognition, language, and task-related behaviours at 18 months: An English study. Sylva, K. and Stein, A. and Leach, Penelope and Barnes, Jacqueline and Malmberg, L.E. (2011) British Journal of Developmental Psychology 29 (1).
  1. Quality and Inequality: Do three- and four-year-olds in deprived areas experience lower quality early years provision? (Sandra Mathers/Rebecca Smees) Oxford University, Nuffield Foundation (2014) 
  1. DfE: Early Years Qualifications List 
  1. Sylva, K., Melhuish, E., Simmons, P., Siraj-Blatchford, I. and Taggart, B., Eds., (2010) Early Childhood Matters: Evidence from the Effective Pre-school and Primary Education Project, Abingdon: Routledge 

Development Milestones Pt 1:

The world of the newborn, an accelerated learning machine.

References:

  1. Gopnik, A., Meltzoff, A., Kuhl, P., 1999. The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind. Morris: New York.
  2. Hopson, J. L. ‘Fetal Psychology’, Psychology Today, 1998, Vol. 31 Issue 5.
  3. DeCasper AJ and Fifer WP. 1980. ‘Of human bonding: newborns prefer their mothers’ voices’. Science. 208(4448)
  4. Dewar, G. 2009 – 2013. The social world of newborns: A guide for the science-minded parent. Retrieved from http://www.parentingscience.com/newborns-and-the-social-world.html
  5. Meltzoff, A.N., and Moore, M.K. 1983. ‘Newborn infants imitate adult facial gestures’. Child Development, 54.
  6. Streri, A., Dolores de Hevia, M., Izard, V., and Coubart, A. ‘What do We Know about Neonatal Cognition?’ Behavioural Sciences. 2013, Vol. 3.

Development Milestones Pt 2:

Discovering the rational infant

References:

  1. Gesell, A. 1925. The mental growth of the pre-school child. New York: Macmillan.
  2. Skinner, B.F. 1974. About Behaviorism. New York: Knopf.
  3. Erikson, E. 1959. Identity and the lifecycle. New York: International Universities Press.
  4. Piaget, J. 1952. The origins of intelligence in children. New York: International Universities Press.
  5. Vygotsky, L. S. 1978. Mind in society: The development of higher psychological process (Luria, Alexander R., Lopez-Morillas, Martin, Cole, Michael, Wertsch, James, Trans.). Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
  6. Bronfenbrenner, U. 1989. ‘Ecological systems theory’. In: R. Vasta (Eds), Six theories of child development: Revised formulations and current issues. Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.
  7. Streri, A., Dolores de Hevia, M., Izard, V., and Coubart, A. ‘What do We Know about Neonatal Cognition?’ Behavioural Sciences. 2013, Vol. 3.
  1. Gopnik, A., Meltzoff, A., Kuhl, P., 1999. The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind. Morris: New York.
  2. Meyerhoff, M. 2006. Understanding cognitive and social development in a newborn. HowStuffWorks.com.
  3. Parents, listen next time your baby babbles. Retrieved from: http://now.uiowa.edu/2014/08/parents-listen-next-time-your-baby-babbles?utm_source=alumniemail&utm_medium=babybabbles&utm_campaign=Alumni+Edition+09-2014
  4. Michiko Asano, Mutsumi Imai, Sotaro Kita, Keiichi Kitajo, Hiroyuki Okada, Guillaume Thierry. ‘Sound symbolism scaffolds language development in preverbal infants’. Cortex, 2015; 63.
  5. Meltzoff, A. 1999. ‘Born to Learn: What Infants Learn from Watching Us’ In: N. Fox & J. Worhol (Eds.), The Role of Early Experience in Infant Development. Pediatric Institute Publications.

Development Milestones Pt 3:

Discovering the rational infant

References:

  1. Deshpande, M., Pirlepesov, F., Lints, T., (2014). ‘Rapid encoding of an internal model for imitative learning’ Proc. R. Soc. B DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.2630.
  1. Piaget, J. (1952). The origins of intelligence in children. New York: International Universities Press
  2. Vygotsky, L. S. (1962). Thought and language. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.
  3. Gopnik, A., Walker, C., (2014). ‘Toddlers Infer Higher-Order Relational Principles in Causal Learning’ Psychological Science January 2014 vol. 25 no. 1
  4. Stahl, A., Feigenson, L., (2015). ‘Observing the unexpected enhances infants’ learning and exploration’ Science 3 April 2015: Vol. 348 no. 6230
  5. Lee, D.N., Aronson, E., (1974). ‘Visual proprioceptive control of standing in human infants.’ Perception and Psychophysics 15.

Development Milestones Pt 4:

The Virtual Two: A work in progress

References:

  1. Piaget, J. (1952). The origins of intelligence in children. New York: International Universities Press.
  2. Shaffer, D. (1993). Developmental psychology: Childhood and adolescence. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.
  3. Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society: the development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  4. Erikson, E. (1959). Identity and life styles: Selected papers. New York: International Universities Press.
  5. Kagan, J., Kearsley, R., Zelazo, P. (1978). Infancy: Its place in human development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  6. Braine, M. (1963). ‘The ontogeny of English phrase structure: The first phrase.’ Language, 39.
  7. De Villiers, J. (1979). ‘Language Development – Infancy, Toddlerhood, Preschool years: the two-year-old’. Retrieved from: http://psychology.jrank.org/pages/369/Language-Development.html
  8. Astington, J. Edward, M. ‘The Development of Theory of Mind in Early Childhood’. Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development [online]. CEECD, SKC-ECD. January 2012. URL: http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/sites/default/files/dossiers-complets/en/social-cognition.pdf#page=16
  9. Early Years Outcomes document 2013. Department for Education. Reference: DFE-00167-2013. Retrieved from: http://www.foundationyears.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Early_Years_Outcomes.pdf
  10. American Academy of Pediatrics, Policy Statement. (2013). PEDIATRICS Vol. 132 No. 5 November 1, 2013.
  11. The Effects of Electronic Media on Children Ages Zero to Six (2005). Retrieved from: https://kaiserfamilyfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/the-effects-of-electronic-media-on-children-ages-zero-to-six-a-history-of-research-issue-brief.pdf
  12. Guardian newspaper. January 2015. ‘Tablets and smartphones may affect social and emotional development, scientists speculate’. Retrieved from: http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/feb/01/toddler-brains-research-smartphones-damage-social-development

Development Milestones Pt 5:

Entry-level Word Processor: The Toddler as an Apprentice ‘Wordamatician’

References:

  1. Piaget, J. (1952). The origins of intelligence in children. New York: International Universities Press.
  2. Fontana, D. (1981). Psychology for Teachers. Macmillan: London.
  3. Piaget, J (1926). The language and thought of the child. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  4. Vygotsky, L. (1962). Thought and language. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  5. Berk, L. (1994). ‘Why Children Talk to Themselves’ Scientific American: November
  6. Planas, M. (1995). ‘The process of children’s ability to ask questions from an interactive perspective.’ Pragmatics 5:1.
  7. Savic, S. (1975). ‘Aspects of adult-child communication: The problem of question acquisition.’ Journal of Child Language 2.
  8. Snow, C. (1986). ‘Conversations with children.’ In P. Fletcher & M. Garman (eds.), Language acquisition.
  9. Playing with words 365 website: http://www.playingwithwords365.com/2012/10/your-childs-speech-language-24-36-months/
  10. Canizares, S. ‘Help your child build a rich vocabulary, and in turn, strong reading and writing skills.’ Retrieved from: http://www.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=8100
  11. Whitehurst, G., Falco, F., Lonigan, C. et al. (1988). Accelerating language development through picture book reading. Developmental Psychology. 24.

Development Milestones Pt 6:

‘Curiouser & curiouser’: The Child’s EYFS Journey Gathers Pace

References:

  1. Lindon, J. (2008). What does it mean to be 4? London: Step Forward Press.
  2. Piaget, J. (1952). The origins of intelligence in children. New York: International Universities Press.
  3. Vygotsky, L. (1981). ‘The genesis of higher mental functions’. In J. Wertsch (Ed.) The concept of activity in Soviet psychology. Armonk, NY: Sharpe.
  4. Eysenck, M., & Flanagan, C. (2001). Psychology for A2 Level. Hove, Sussex: Psychology Press.
  5. Bruner, J. S. (1960). The Process of education. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
  6. Gabbard, C. & Rodrigues, L. (2015). ‘Optimizing Early Brain and Motor Development Through Movement’. Earlychildhood NEWS article, retrieved from: http://www.earlychildhoodnews.com/earlychildhood/article_view.aspx?ArticleID=360
  7. Fontana, D. (1981). Psychology for Teachers. London: Macmillan.
  8. Legare, C., & Lombrozo, T. (2014). ‘Selective Effects of Explanation on Learning in Early Childhood’. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology Vol. 126, Oct. 2014.
  9. Vales, C., & Smith, L. (2015). ‘Words, shape, visual search and visual working memory in 3-year-old children’. Developmental Science 18:1 (2015).
  1. Walker, C., Gopnik, A., and Ganea, P. (2015). ‘Learning to Learn From Stories: Children’s Developing Sensitivity to the Causal Structure of Fictional Worlds.’ Child Development, Jan/Feb 2015, Vol. 86, No. 1.
  2. Squire, L., Zola-Morgan, S., Cave, C., Haist, F., Musen, G., Suzuki, W. (1990). ‘Memory: Organization of brain systems and cognition’. In Symposium on quantitative biology, the brain (Vol. 55). Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.
  3. Donaldson, M. (1978). Children’s Minds. London: Fontana Press.

Development Milestones Pt 7:

Magnets and miracles: the EYFS twilight zone

References:

  1. Pink Floyd (1994). ‘High Hopes’ from The Division Bell.
  2. Donaldson, M. (1978). Children’s Minds. London: Fontana Press.
  3. Gopnik, A. (2011). ‘Why Preschool Shouldn’t Be Like School’. Slate. Retrieved from: http://www.slate.com/articles/double_x/doublex/2011/03/why_preschool_shouldnt_be_like_school.html
  4. Gopnik, A. (2005). ‘How We Learn’. New York Times. Retrieved from: http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/16/education/edlife/how-we-learn.html?_r=0
  5. Bonawitz, E., et al. (2010). ‘The double-edged sword of pedagogy: Instruction limits spontaneous exploration and discovery’. Cognition.
  6. Buchsbaum, D., et al. (2011). ‘Children’s imitation of causal action sequences is influenced by statistical and pedagogical evidence’. Cognition.
  7. Piaget, J. (1952). The origins of intelligence in children. New York: International Universities Press.
  8. Fontana, D. (1981). Psychology for Teachers. London: Macmillan.
  9. Sandström, C. (1966). The Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. Methuen.
  10. Vygotsky, L. (1981). ‘The genesis of higher mental functions’. In J. Wertsch (Ed.) The concept of activity in Soviet psychology. Armonk, NY: Sharpe.
  11. Maslow, A. (1954). Motivation and personality. New York: Harper.

Special Educational Needs in the Early Years: an overview

References:

  1. Meighan, R. (1981) A Sociology of Educating. London: Cassell.
  2. Devarakonda, C. (2013) Diversity & Inclusion in Early Childhood. London: Sage Publications.
  3. Disabled Peoples’ International (1981) Canada. (Extract from ‘Proceedings of the First World Congress’ Disabled Peoples’ International, Singapore, 30 November-4 December, 1981).
  4. Frederickson, N. & Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. OUP.
  5. Thomas, G. & Loxley, A. (2001) Deconstructing Special Education and Constructing Inclusion. OUP.
  6. Ainscow, M. (1995) ‘Education for all: making it happen’. Support for Learning, 10(4).
  7. Savage, K. (2015) ‘Children, young people, inclusion and social policy’ In: Brodie, K. & Savage, K. (eds.), Inclusion and Early Years Practice. London: Routledge.
  8. Department for Education and Skills (2001a) Special Educational Needs Code of Practice, Ref. DfES/581/2001. London: DfES.
  9. Roffey, S. (1999) Special Needs in the Early Years. London: Fulton.
  10. Capel, S., Leask, M. and Turner, T. (1995) Learning to Teach in the Secondary School. London: Routledge.

SEN: Language Impairment

References:

  1. Meighan, R. (1981) A Sociology of Educating. London: Cassell.
  2. Crystal, D. and Varley, R. (1998) Introduction to Language Pathology. London: Whurr.
  3. Frederickson, N. & Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. OUP.
  4. Hartshorne, M. (2009) ‘The Cost to the Nation of Children’s Poor Communication’. In: Brodie, K. & Savage, K. (eds.), Inclusion and Early Years Practice. London: Routledge.
  5. Law, J. and Tamhne, R. (2000) ‘The size of the problem’. In: Law, J., Parkinson, S. and Tamhne, R. (eds.), Communication Difficulties in Childhood: A Practical Guide. Abingdon: Radcliffe Medical Press.
  6. Crutchley, A., Conti-Ramsden, G. and Botting, N. (1997b) ‘Bilingual children with specific language impairment and standardised assessments: preliminary findings from a study of children in language units.’ International Journal of Bilingualism, 1 (2).
  7. Whitehead, M. (1999) Supporting Language and Literacy Development in the Early Years. London: OUP.
  8. Thomas, M. (2006) ‘Language acquisition in developmental disorders.’ In: M. Kail, M. Hickmann & M. Fayol (Eds.), Proceedings of the International Conference on First and Second Language Acquisition, Paris.
  9. Lees, J. and Urwin, S. (1997) Children with Language Disorders. London: Whurr.
  10. Pritchard, G. and Brodie, K. (2015) ‘A family’s perspective on Special Educational Needs’. In: Brodie, K. & Savage, K. (eds.), Inclusion and Early Years Practice. London: Routledge.
  11. Devarakonda, C. (2013) Diversity & Inclusion in Early Childhood. London: Sage Publications.

SEN: Autistic Spectrum Disorders

References:

  1. Baron-Cohen, S., Leslie, A., and Frith, U. (1985). ‘Does the autistic child have a theory of mind?’ Cognition. 21
  2. Eysenck, M., & Flanagan, C. (2001). Psychology for A2 Level. London: Psychology Press Ltd.
  3. Wellman, H. (1994). ‘Early understanding of the mind: The normal case.’ In: S. Baron-Cohen (Ed.), Understanding other minds: Perspectives from autism. New York: Oxford University Press.
  4. Frith, U. (2005). ‘Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome.’ In: S. Dunsmuir and N. Frederickson (Eds.), Autistic Spectrum Disorders. London: Educational Psychology Publishing.
  5. Frederickson, N. & Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. OUP.
  6. Glenn, A., Cousins, J., and Helps, A. (2005). Removing Barriers to Learning in the Early Years. London: Fulton.
  7. Kanner, L. (1943).’ Autistic disturbances of affective contact.’ Nervous Child. 2
  8. Asperger, H. (1944). ‘Autistic psychopathy in childhood.’ In: U. Frith (Ed.), Autism and Asperger Syndrome (1991). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  9. Wing, L., (1996). The Autistic Spectrum. London: Robinson.
  10. Siegel, B. (2003). Helping Children with Autism Learn. London: OUP.
  11. Howlin, P. (1998). Children with Autism and Asperger syndrome: A Guide for Practitioners and Carers. London: Wiley.
  12. Howlin, P. and Rutter, M. (1987a). Treatment of Autistic Children. Chichester: Wiley.

SEN: Understanding Learning Difficulties

References:

  1. Department for Education and Employment (DfEE) (1996) Education Act 1996. London: DfEE.
  2. Gardner, H. (1993) Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. London: Fontana Press.
  3. Barbe, W., Swassing, R., and Michael N. (1979) Teaching through modality strengths: concepts and practices. Columbus, Ohio: Zaner-Bloser.
  4. Kolb, D. (1984) Experiential learning: experience as the source of learning and development. NJ: Pearson Education.
  5. Lindsay, G., Pather, S. and Strand, S. (2006) Special Educational Needs and Ethnicity: Issues of Over- and Under-representation. DfES Research Report No. 757. London: DfES.
  6. Tomlinson, S. (1988) ‘Why Jonny can’t read: critical theory and special education’. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 3 (1).
  7. Vygotsky, L. (1978) Mind in Society: The Development of Higher Psychological Processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard.
  8. Budoff, M. (1987) ‘The validity of learning potential assessments’. In C.S. Lidz (ed.) Dynamic Assessment: An Interactional Approach to Evaluating Learning Potential. NY: Guilford Press.
  9. Frederickson, N. & Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. London: OUP.
  10. Watson, J. (2000) ‘Constructive Instruction and Learning Difficulties’. Support for Learning, 15 (3).

SEN: Behavioural, Social and Emotional

References:

  1. BMA Board of Science. (2013) Growing up in the UK: ensuring a healthy future for our children. BMA: London. http://bma.org.uk/working-for-change/improving-and-protecting-health/child-health/growing-up-in-the-uk
  2. Department for Education (1994c). Code of Practice for the Identification and Assessment of Special Educational Needs. London:Her Majesty’s Stationery Office.
  3. Department for Education (DFE). (2013) Special educational needs in England: January 2013. SFR 30/2013
  4. Office for National Statistics. (2005). Mental Health of Children and Young People in Great Britain, 2004. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 5269,
  5. Bauer, A. M., & Shea, T. M. (1999). Learners with emotional and behavioral disorders: An introduction.
  6. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.
  7. Rogers, C. (1959). ‘A theory of therapy, personality and interpersonal relationships as developed in the client-centered framework’. In (ed.) S. Koch, Psychology: A study of a science. Vol. 3: Formulations of the person and the social context. New York: McGraw Hill.
  8. Heider, F. (1958). The Psychology of Interpersonal Relations. New York: Wiley.
  9. Kelley, H. H. (1967). ‘Attribution theory in social psychology’. In D. Levine (ed.), Nebraska Symposium on Motivation (Volume 15, pp. 192-238). Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
  10. Festinger, L. (1957). A Theory of cognitive dissonance. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  11. Pavlov, I. P. (1897). The work of the digestive glands. London: Griffin.
  12. Skinner, B. F. (1938). The Behavior of organisms: An experimental analysis. New York: Appleton-Century.
  13. Bandura, A. (1977). Social learning theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  14. Frederickson, N. & Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. OUP.
  15. Bennathan, M. and Boxall, M. (2000) ‘Effective Intervention in Primary Schools: Nurture Groups.’ In: Frederickson, N. & Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. OUP.
  16. Maccoby, E., & Martin, J., (1983). ‘Socialization in the context of the family: Parent–child interaction’. In P. H. Mussen & E. M. Hetherington, Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 4. Socialization, personality, and social development. New York: Wiley.

SEN: Social and Emotional Wellbeing

References:

  1. Maslow, A. (1943) ‘A theory of human motivation’. Psychological Review, 50.
  2. Fontana, D. (1981) Psychology for Teachers. London: Macmillan.
  3. DfES (2004) The Children Act 2004. London: HMSO.
  4. Laming, H. (2003) The Victoria Climbié Inquiry: Summary Report of an Inquiry. Norwich: HMSO.
  5. DfES (2003b) Every Child Matters. London: The Stationery Office.
  6. Frederickson, N. & Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. OUP.
  7. DfES (2005d) Excellence and Enjoyment: Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning. Nottingham: DfES Publications.
  8. Mayo, E. (1949) The Social Problems of an Industrial Civilisation. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  9. Frederickson, N. and Graham, B. (1999) ‘Social skills and emotional intelligence’. In: N. Frederickson and R. Cameron (eds.) Psychology in Education Portfolio. Windsor. NFER-Nelson.
  10. Bruner, J. S. (1960). The Process of education. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
  11. Nutbrown, C. and Clough, P. with Atherton, F. (2013) Inclusion in the Early Years. London: Sage Publications.

SEN: Sensory Impairments

References:

  1. Equality Act 2010, London: Stationery Office. Equality and Human Rights Commission, (2015)
  2. Reasonable Adjustments for Disabled Pupils: Guidance for Schools in England. London: Stationery Office.
  3. National Deaf Children’s Society (2012) Supporting the achievement of deaf children in early years settings. London: NDCS.
  4. DfE (2011) Early Support: Information about deafness and hearing loss. London: DfE.
  5. The Ear Foundation report to NDCS (2015) Mild-moderate hearing loss in children. London: NDCS.
  6. Fortnum, H., Marshall. D., Bamford, J. and Summerfield, A. (2002) ‘Hearing-impaired children in the UK: education setting and communication approach.’ Deafness and Education International, 4 (3).
  7. Frederickson, N. & Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. OUP.
  8. DfE (2011) Early Support: Information about Visual Impairment. London: DfE.
  9. Keil, S. and Clunies-Ross, L. (2003) Survey of Educational Provision for Blind and Partially Sighted Children in England, Scotland and Wales in 2002. London: RNIB.
  10. 10. RNIB (2012) Focus on Foundation. London: RNIB.
  11. United Nations (UN) (2006) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Geneva: UN.

SEN: Physical Needs

References:

  1. Frederickson, N. & Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. OUP.
  2. World Health Organization (2011) World Report on Disability. Geneva: World Health Organization.
  3. Disability Discrimination Act (2005) London: The Stationery Office.
  4. Devarakonda, C. (2013) Diversity & Inclusion in Early Childhood. London: Sage Publications.
  5. Croll, P. and Moses, D. (2000) Special Needs in the Primary School: One in Five? London: Cassell.
  6. Bloom, A. (2005) Teachers shy away from hyperactivity and autism. Times Educational Supplement, 14 October: 4.
  7. Fontana, D. (1981) Psychology for Teachers. London: Macmillan.
  8. Sport England (2001) Young People With A Disability & Sport. London.
  9. Reid, D. and Valle, J. ‘The discursive practice of learning disability: Implications for instruction and parent-school relations’. Journal of Learning Disability. 2004 Nov-Dec;37(6).
  10. Nurse, A. (2001) A question of inclusion. In L. Abbot and C. Nutbrown (eds.) Experiencing Reggio Emilia: Implications for Preschool Education. Buckingham: Open University Press.

SEN: Decrypting Dyslexia

References:

  1. Walker, J. (1989) In P. Widlake Special Children Handbook: Meeting Special Needs within the Mainstream School, London: Hutchinson.
  2. Daily Mail, June 17, 2015. ‘This Font Simulates What It’s Like To Have Dyslexia’ Britton, D.website: http://danielbritton.info/195836/2165784/design/dyslexia
  3. British Dyslexia Association: http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/dyslexic/dyslexia-and-specific-difficulties-overview
  4. Lawrence, D. (2008) Understanding dyslexia: A guide for teachers and parents. London: Open University Press.
  5. Department for Education and Employment (1994a) Code of Practice on the Identification and Assessment of Special Educational Needs. London: HMSO.
  6. Stillman, A. and Gillingham, B. (1936) Remedial work for reading, spelling and penmanship. London: Sackett, & Wilhelms.
  7. Dennison, P. (1981) Switching on: a guide to Edu-Kinesthetics. Ventura: California Edu-Kinesthetics.
  8. Dore, W. (2006). Dyslexia: the miracle cure. London: John Blake Publishing
  9. British Psychological Society (1999) Working Party Of The Division Of Educational And Child Psychology Dyslexia, Literacy and Psychological Assessment, Leicester: British Psychological Society
  10. Gardner, H. (1983) Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. London: Fontana.
  11. Galaburda, A., Menard, M., and Rosen, G. (1994). ‘Evidence for aberrant auditory anatomy in developmental dyslexia’. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 91 (17)
  12. Silverman, L. (2002). Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual-Spatial Learner. Denver: DeLeon Publishing.
  13. Freed, J & Parsons, L. (1997). Right-Brained Children in a Left-Brained World. New York: Fireside.
  14. Goswami, U. (2006) ‘Neuroscience and education from research to practice?’ Nature Review Neuroscience, 7.
  15. Creavin, A. Raghu, L. Steer, C. and Williams, C. (2015) ‘Ophthalmic Abnormalities and Reading Impairment’. Pediatrics, official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Social and Separation Anxiety in Early Years

1. http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/healthadvice/parentsandyouthinfo/parentscarers/worriesandanxieties.aspx
2. https://www.anxietyuk.org.uk/get-help-now/anxiety-information/young-people-and-anxiety/resources/
3. http://www.mumsnet.com/jobs/childcare-separation-anxiety

Pretend Play

1.’A Practical Guide to Activities for Young Children’ Hobart and Frankel, Stanley Thornes Ltd. 1995
http://www.brighthorizons.com/family-resources/e-family-news/2013-importance-of-pretend-play-in-child-development/
2.https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/beautiful-minds/201203/the-need-pretend-play-in-child-development

Playing & Learning Outdoors Part 1

1. Balmford A, Clegg L, Coulson T and Taylor J; (2002) ‘Why conservationists should heed Pokémon.’ Science 295.
2. Barkham, P. (2013) ‘No freedom to play or explore outside for children’ Guardian newspaper, 13/07/2013.
3. Bird, W. (2007) Natural Thinking, Report commissioned by RSPB & Natural England.
4. Carter, C. (2014) ‘Children spend less than 30 minutes playing outside a week.’ Daily Telegraph newspaper, 06/04/2014.
5. Jennings, R. (2014) ‘The Discovery of Wild Things: Assessing Children’s Play in Naturalized Playgrounds’ Prescott College dissertation: UMI Number: 1555917
6. Laird, S. & McFarland-Piazza, L., (2014) ‘Children need to play outdoors, but we’re not letting them.’ Article retrieved from: http://theconversation.com/children-need-to-play-outdoors-but-were-not-letting-them-31295
Learning through Landscapes (2004) Early Years Vision and values for Outdoor Play Research report.
7. Louv, R. (2005) Last child in the woods :saving our children from nature-deficit disorder. Chapel Hill, NC.
8. Voce, A. (2016) http://www.firstdiscoverers.co.uk/childcare-conversations-with-adrian-voce/
9. White, J. (2008) Playing and Learning Outdoors: Making Provision for High Quality Experiences in the Outdoor Learning Environment. Routledge: London.

The Truth Behind Those 30 Hours of Free Childcare

1. DfE Review of childcare costs: www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/479659/151124_Analytical_review_FINAL_VERSION.pdf

2. 30 hour childcare pilot in crisis: http://www.nurseryworld.co.uk/nursery-world/news/1157130/30-hour-childcare-pilot-in-crisis

Natural Born Learners

References:
1. Bilton, H. (2010) Outdoor Learning in the Early Years. London: Routledge. Education Scotland (2015) ‘Take learning outside’ Early Years MattersArticles.
2. Fontana, D. (1981) Psychology for Teachers. London: Macmillan.
3. Gopnik, A. (2005) ‘How We Learn’. New York Times. Retrieved from:

4. Isaacs, S. (1952) ‘The nature and function of phantasy’ In M. Klein, P. Heimann, S. Isaacs and J. Riviere (Eds), Developments in Psycho-analysis, 43. London: Hogarth Press.
5. Kellert, S.(2002) ‘Experiencing nature: Affective, cognitive and evaluative development in children’. In P.H. Kahn & S.R.
6. Kellert (Eds.) Children and Nature: Psychological, Sociocultural and Evolutionary Investigations, London: MIT.
7. Kritchensky, S., Prescott, E. and Walling, L. (1977) ‘Planning Environments for Young Children: Physical Space.’ In
8. Bilton, H. Outdoor Learning in the Early Years. London: Routledge.
9. Malone, K. & Tranter, P. (2003) ‘School grounds as sites for learning: making the most of environmental opportunities’, Environmental Education Research, 9(3).
10. McMillan, M. (1919) The Nursery School. London: J.M. Dent.
11. Thomas, F. & Harding, S. (2011) ‘The role of play: The outdoors as the medium and mechanism for well-being, learning and development.’ In J. White (Ed) Outdoor Provision in the Early Years London: Sage publications.
12.Woods, A. (2013) ‘How outdoor play inspires independent learning for early years.’ Green Schools, Guardian newspaper, 04/06/2013.

 

Helping Children to Cope with Stress and Change

Penelope Leach’s ‘Baby and Child’, 1994 edition

A Modern Paranoia: Perspectives On Risk

References:

de Botton, A. (2015) ‘Conclusion’ In P. Morland Risk Wise London: Profile books

Corley, E. & Utermann, A. (2015) ‘Afterword’ In P. Morland Risk Wise London: Profile books

Dweck,C. (2000). Self-theories: Their role in motivation, personality and development. Taylor &

Francis: Philadelphia, PA.

Gardner, D. (2009) Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear. London: Virgin books

Gigerenzer, G. (2006) ‘Out of the Frying Pan into the Fire: Behavioral Reactions to Terrorist Attacks’ Risk Analysis, Vol. 26, No. 2

Guldberg, H. (2009) Reclaiming Childhood: Freedom and Play in an Age of Fear. London: Routledge.

Morland, P. (2015) Risk Wise. London: Profile books

Moss, S. (2012) Natural Childhood. National Trust

Solly, K. (2015) Risk, Challenge and Adventure in the Early Years. London: Routledge.

Tovey, H. (2001) ‘Achieving the balance: Challenge, risk and safety’ In J. White (Ed) Outdoor Provision in the Early Years London: Sage publications.

 

Outdoor adventures: The benefits of risk & challenge

de Botton, A. (2015) ‘Conclusion’ In P. Morland Risk Wise London: Profile books.

Cowley, S. (2016) http://www.firstdiscoverers.co.uk/childcare-conversations-with-sue-cowley/

Fontana, D. (1981) Psychology for Teachers. London: Macmillan.

Gill, T. (2007) No Fear. Growing Up in a Risk Averse Society. London: Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation.

Morland, P. (2015) Risk Wise. London: Profile books

Sandseter, (2011) ‘Children’s risky play in early childhood education and care.’ Childlinks, Issue 3. London: Barnardos publication.

Solly, K. (2015) Risk, Challenge and Adventure in the Early Years. London: Routledge.

Spinka, M., Newberry, R., and Bekoff, M. (2001) ‘Mammalian play: Training for the unexpected.’ The Quarterly Review of Biology, 76 (2).

Stephenson, A. (2003) ‘Physical risk-taking: dangerous or endangered?’ Early Years, 23 (1).

Tovey, H. (2010) ‘Playing on the edge: Perceptions of risk and danger in outdoor play.’ In P. Broadhead, J. Howard and E. Woods (eds.) Play and Learning in the Early Years: From Research to Practice. London: Sage publications.

Tovey, H. (2011) ‘Achieving the balance: Challenge, risk and safety’ In J. White (Ed) Outdoor Provision in the Early Years London: Sage publications.

Voce, A. (2016) http://www.firstdiscoverers.co.uk/childcare-conversations-with-adrian-voce/

Assisting Autistic Children with Social Interaction

Comic Redesigns the Autism Spectrum to Crush Stereotypes

http://theincredibleflexibleyou.com/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Incredible-Flexible-YouTM-Curriculum-Set/dp/1936943050

 

Play and the Nature of Play

Ackerman, D. (1999) Deep Play. New York: Random House.

Gill, T. (2009) ‘Now for free-range childhood’, in Guardian, 2 April 2009.

www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/apr/02/children-safety

Hutt, C. (1979) Play in the Under-fi ves: Form, development and function. Unpublished manuscript.

Isaacs, S. (1932) The Children We Teach. London: University of London Press.

Plato (360 BC) Laws, translated by Benjamin Jowett. New York: Basic Books.

Santer, J., Griffiths, C., Goodall, D. L., National Children’s Bureau., & Play England (Project). (2007). Free play in early childhood: A literature review. London: National Children’s Bureau.

Thomas, F., and Harding, S. (2011) ‘The role of play’. In J. White (Ed) Outdoor Provision in the Early YearsLondon: Sage publications.
Vygotsky, L. (1967) ‘Play and Its Role in the Mental Development of the Child.’ Soviet Psychology 5.

Vygotsky, L. (1978) Mind in Society: The Development of Higher Psychological Processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

Strategies to help children with autism cope with anxiety

http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/autism_spectrum_disorder_anxiety.html
https://www.iidc.indiana.edu/pages/anxiety-and-autism-spectrum-disorders
https://www.autismspeaks.org/blog/2014/05/29/managing-anxiety-children-autism
http://www.educateautism.com/social-stories.html
http://www.amazeclassroom.org.au/visual_timetable_maker2.html

 

Special, disabled or just unique? Language can be important, but attitude is everything.

Rogers, Carl (1951), Client-Centered Therapy: Its Current Practice, Implications and Theory. London: Constable.

Warnock, Baroness, Mary, (1978), Special Educational Needs: Report of the Committee of Enquiry into the Education of Handicapped Children and Young People (The Warnock Report),

 

Playworker: The adult role in outdoor play & learning

Bilton, H. (2002) Outdoor Play in the Early Years. London: David Fulton Publishers.

Bilton, H. (2010) Outdoor Learning in the Early Years. London: Routledge.

DCSF (Department for Children, Schools and Families) (2008) The Early Years Foundation Stage. Nottingham: DfCSF Publications.

Elkonin, D. (2005a) ‘Chapter 1: ŠSubject of Our Research: Developed Forms of Play.’ Journal of Russian and East European Psychology 43.

Richland L. and Burchinal M. (2013) ‘Early Executive Function Predicts Reasoning Development’ Psychological Science vol. 24 no. 1.

Solly, K. (2015) Risk, Challenge and Adventure in the Early Years. London: Routledge.

Thorne, B. (2002) ‘How to promote co-operative relationships among children’ In Pollard, A., (ed.) Readings for Reflective Teaching. London: Continuum.

Vygotsky, L. (1978) Mind in Society: The Development of Higher Psychological Processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Waller, T. (2011) ‘Adults are essential: The roles of adults outdoors’ In J. White (Ed) Outdoor Provision in the Early Years London: Sage publications.

Zaporozhets, A. (1986) Izbrannye psychologicheskie trudy [Selected psychological works].

Signs of Asperger’s Syndrome in Children

The Royal Children’s Hospital. 2012. Kids Health Info: Aspergers Syndrome. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.rch.org.au/kidsinfo/fact_sheets/Aspergers_Syndrome/.

Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children. 2011. Asperger’s Syndrome. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.gosh.nhs.uk/medical-information-0/search-medical-conditions/aspergers-syndrome.

The National Autistic Society. 2016. Asperger Syndrome. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.autism.org.uk/about/what-is/asperger.aspx.

Kids Health from Nemours. 2012. Asperger Syndrome. [ONLINE] Available at: http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/asperger.html#.

The Outdoor Landscape: An Interactive Environment

Carr, M. (2001) Assessment in Early Childhood Settings. London: Paul Chapman.

Corsaro, W. (2011) The Sociology of Childhood. London: Sage Publications.

Craft, A. (2002) Creativity and Early Years Education. London: Sage Publications.

de Lissa, L. (1939) Life in the Nursery School. London: Longmans.

Garrick, R. (2011) A Responsive Environment. In J. White (Ed) Outdoor Provision in the Early Years London: Sage publications.

James, A. and Prout, A. (Eds) (1997) Constructing and Reconstructing Childhood London: FalmerRoutledge.

McMillan, M. (1919) ‘Nursery schools’, The Times Educational Supplement, 13 February.

Montessori, M. (1912) The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children’s Houses. New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company.

Autism Friendly Nurseries

http://pecs-unitedkingdom.com/index.php

https://autismconnect.org.uk/index.php/site/visualresource

http://www.5pointscale.com/more_sweet_scale.htm

http://www.educateautism.com/free-materials-and-downloads.html

http://www.autism.org.uk/professionals/teachers/teaching-young-children.aspx

http://www.kathybrodie.com/guest-post/classroom-tips/

 

Strategies for relieving back to school anxiety

http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/starting_school.html

http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/school_morning_routines.html/context/591

http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetails.aspx?p=114&np=122&id=1770

https://www.kidsmatter.edu.au/mental-health-matters/mental-health-difficulties/anxiety

https://www.kidsmatter.edu.au/families/mental-health-difficulties/anxiety/anxiety-suggestions-teaching-staff

https://www.kidsmatter.edu.au/families/mental-health-difficulties/anxiety/anxiety-suggestions-parents-and-carers

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/going-to-school/starting-school/before-school-starts/

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/going-to-school/starting-school/first-days/

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/going-to-school/starting-school/tips/

 

Inclusive Outdoor Play

Barnardo’s, (2005) ‘Let’s play together’ Report authors: Ludvigsen, A., Creegan, C. and Mills, H. Barnardo’s: London.

Casey, T. (2011) ‘Outdoor play for everyone’ In J. White (Ed) Outdoor Provision in the Early Years London: Sage publications.

Bilton, H. (2010) Outdoor Learning in the Early Years. London: Routledge.

Hestenes, L. and Carroll, D. (2000) ‘The play interactions of young children with and without disabilities: Individual and environmental influences’, Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 15, 2.

Hollyhock, J. (undated) ‘Inclusion outdoors’ Retrieved from: http://www.teachearlyyears.com/enabling-environments/view/inclusion-outdoors.

National Children’s Bureau report: ‘Free play in early childhood’, (2007) Authors: Santer, J. and Griffiths, C. with Goodall, D. National Children’s Bureau: London.

Thomas, N and Smith, C (2004) ‘Developing play skills in children with autistic spectrum disorders’, Educational Psychology in Practice, 20, 3.

PLEYIn report: ‘Play and Learning in the Early Years for Inclusion – PLEYIn’, (2011) Authors: Baranowska, W. et al. Newman University College: Birmingham.

Ploughman, N. (2008) ‘Exercise is brain food: the effects of physical activity on cognitive function’, Developmental Neurohabilitation, July – September, 11 (3).

United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child (2006) General Comment No. 9: The Rights of Disabled Children. Geneva: United Nations.

 

Improving Self-esteem in children

http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/self-esteem_different_ages.html

http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/body-image.html?WT.ac=p-ra#

http://www.youngminds.org.uk/for_parents/parents_guidehttp://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/mentalhealth/Pages/Dealingwithlowself-esteem.aspx

 

Extreme childcare: Wild play in Plas Madoc

Bilton, H. (2010) Outdoor Learning in the Early Years London: Routledge.
Cunningham, H. (2006) The Invention of Childhood London: BBC Books.
de Botton, A. (2015) ‘Conclusion’ In P. Morland Risk Wise London: Profile books.
Froud, D. (2015) ‘Role models: Elizabeth Denby and Marjory Allen’ Architects’ Journal, 24 January 2015.
Gill, T. (2013) video footage ‘Lady Allen – the godmother of play – speaks’ Retrieved from: https://rethinkingchildhood.com/2013/06/24/lady-allen-godmother-play/
Hurtwood, Lady Allen of. (1968) Planning for Play London: Thames and Hudson.
Kozlovsky, R. (2007) ‘Adventure Playgrounds and Postwar Reconstructions’ In Gutman, M. and Coninck-Smith, N. (Eds.) Designing Modern Childhoods: History, Space and the Material Culture of Childhood: An International Reader Rutgers International Press.
Moore, A. (2014) ‘The Land adventure playground, Plas Madoc’ Guardian newspaper, 10 May, 2014.
Morland, P. (2015) Risk Wise. London: Profile books.
Postman, N. (1982) The Disappearance of Childhood London: Allen.
Rosin, H. (2014) ‘The Overprotected Kid’ The Atlantic (magazine) April, 2014.

 

Debate on Digital Technologies in the Nursery:

Guernsey, L. and Levine, M. (2015) Tap, Click, Read; Growing readers in a world of screens. Jossey-Bass

Literacy Trust (2016) How to choose apps Available from: http://literacyapps.literacytrust.org.uk/how-to-choose-apps Accessed 14th October 2016

Livingstone, S., Marsh, J., Plowman, L., Ottovordemgentschenfelde, S. and Fletcher-Watson, B. (2015) Young Children (0-8) and Digital Technology: A qualitative exploratory study London School of Economics and Political Science

Picton, I. (2014) The Impact of ebooks on the Reading Motivation and

Reading Skills of Children and Young People National Literacy Trust

Shifrin, D. et al (2015) Growing Up Digital: Media Research Symposium. American Academy of Pediatrics.

 

Tots & Tablets: 21st Century Digital Natives

Bruner, J. (1973) Going Beyond the Information Given. New York: Norton.
Fisch, K. (2008) Shift Happens. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emx92kBKads
Geist, E.A. (2012). ‘A Qualitative Examination of Two Year-Olds Interaction with Tablet Based Interactive Technology’. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 39(1).
Gopnik, A. (2015) Toddlers Can Master Computers. Available at https://www.edge.org/response-detail/26626
Kaye, L. (2016) Young children in a digital age. New York: Routledge.
Piaget, J. (1936) The origins of intelligence in children. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.
Puerling, B (n.d.) See www.asg.nz/page.aspx?ID=5435 In: Kaye, L. Young children in a digital age. New York: Routledge.
Rosin, H. (2013) ‘The touchscreen generation’. The Atlantic, 20 March 2013.
Sebastian, J. (1968) Younger Generation, Lovin’ Spoonful single issued on Kama Sutra label 1970.
Vygotsky, L. (1978) Mind In Society: The Development of Higher Psychological Processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

Autism Resources

What is Autism?

After the Autism Diagnosis: Staying Connected as a Couple

The Guide to Securing Life-long Accommodations for Adult Children with Special Needs

When an Autism Diagnosis Comes in Adulthood

Creating a Sensory-Friendly Home for Your Autistic Child

Supporting Individuals on the Autism Spectrum Coping with Grief and Loss through Death or Divorce

Assistive Technologies and Special Educational Needs

Autism Community (n.d.) ‘Assistive Technology.’ Retrieved from: http://www.autism-community.com/education/assistive-technology/
Blagojevic, B., Brumer, H., Chevalier, S., O’Clair, A., and Thomes, K. (2012) ‘Touch and Grow: Learning and Exploring Using Tablets.’ Teaching Young Children, Vol. 6. No. 1, NAEYC Publications.
Harding, J. (2016) ‘The power of digital symbolic representation.’ In: Kaye, L. (Ed.) Young children in a digital age. New York: Routledge.
Hayes, H. (2013) ‘How Technology Is Helping Special-Needs Students Excel.’ EdTech Spring 2013 issue. Retrieved from: http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/classroom
Kress, G. (2003) Literacy in the New Media Age. London: Routledge.
Milligan, S. (2003) ‘Assistive Technology: Supporting the Participation of Children with Disabilities.’ Beyond the Journal – Young Children on the Web – November 2003. NAEYC Publications.
Parette, H., and Blum, C. (2015) ‘Including All Young Children in the Technology-Supported Curriculum: A UDL Technology Integration Framework for 21st-Century Classrooms.’ In: C. Donohue (Ed.) Technology and Digital Media in the Early Years. New York:Routledge.
Puerling, B., and Fowler, A. (2015) ‘Technology Tools for Teachers and Teaching: Innovative Practices and Emerging Technologies.’ In: C. Donohue (Ed.) Technology and Digital Media in the Early Years. New York:Routledge.
Rose, D., and Meyer, A. (2002) Teaching every student in the digital age: Universal design for learning. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Virtual Reality” Harnessing the Power of Illusion

Chatfield, T. (2016) ‘A vision of the future.’ Prospect Magazine. April, 2016.

Didehbania, N., Allena, T., Kandalafta, M., Krawczyka, D., Chapmana, S. (2016 ) ‘Virtual Reality Social Cognition Training for children with high functioning autism.’ Computers in Human Behavior Volume 62, September.

Falconer, C., Rovira, A., King, J., Gilbert, P., Antley, A., Fearon, P., Ralph, N., Slater, M., Brewin, R. ‘Embodying self-compassion within virtual reality and its effects on patients with depression.’ British Journal of Psychiatry Open Feb 2016, 2 (1).

Haddad, D. (2015) ‘The Benefits of Virtual Reality for Children with Learning Disabilities.’ Retrieved from: https://www.verywell.com/vr-children-learning-disabilities-2162629

Heathman, A. (2016) ‘Google is bringing VR to one million UK school children.’ Retrieved from: http://www.wired.co.uk/article/google-digital-skills-vr-pledge

Josman, N. Milika Ben-Chaim, H. Friedrich, S. & Weiss, P.L. (2008). ‘Effectiveness of Virtual Reality for Teaching Street-Crossing Skills to Children and Adolescents with Autism.’ Journal on Disability and Human Development, 7 (1).

Kaye, L. (2016) Young children in a digital age. New York: Routledge.

Marsh, J. (2010) ‘Young children’s play in online virtual worlds.’ Journal of Early Childhood Research · February 2010.

Ofcom (2016) Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes Report. https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0024/78513/childrens_parents_nov2015.pdf

Parkin, S. (2016) ‘After the success of Pokémon Go!, what is the future for augmented reality?’ Guardian newspaper, 23rd October 2016.

Ramli, D. (2016) ‘Virtual Reality Classrooms Another Way Chinese Kids Gain an Edge.’ Retrieved from: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-08-09/virtual-reality-classrooms-another-way-chinese-kids-gain-an-edge

The National Autistic Society (2016) Too Much Information: Alexander’s World (video) accessed via: http://www.autism.org.uk/get-involved/tmi/virtual.aspx

 

Virtual Interview

Dewey, J. (1915) Schools of Tomorrow. New York: Kessinger.

Gibran, K. (1923) The Prophet. New York: Knopf.

Prensky, M. (2001b). ‘Digital natives, digital immigrants part 1’. On The Horizon, 9(5).

http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/10748120110424816

Scollan, A. and Gallagher, B. (2016) ‘Personal and socio-emotional development and technology.’ In: Kaye, L. (ed.) Young Children in a Digital Age. New York: Routledge.

Vygotsky, L. (1929). ‘The problem of the cultural development of the child.’ Journal of Genetic Psychology, Volume 36.

Vygotsky, L. (1934) Thinking and Speaking. New York: MIT Press.

 

Early Years Music as a Non-Specialist

Gower, A. (2016) ‘You don’t have to be a specialist to make music with your primary class’ Retrieved from: http://www.teachwire.net/news/you-dont-have-to-be-a-specialist-to-make-music-with-your-primary-class
Greenhalgh, Z. (2015) ‘Why Music in the EYFS?’ TACTYC Conference paper.

 

Importance of play based learning

United Nations rankings 2016: http://www.mbctimes.com/english/20-best-education-systems-world

PISA rankings 2016: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-38212070

Attention span calculation: http://readwriteact.org/files/2014/07/BehaviorManagement-ImportantFacts.pdf

Assessment of attention in pre-schoolers: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3511648/

The Cambridge Primary Review: http://www.readyunlimited.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/An-Introduction-to-the-Cambridge-Primary-Review.pdf

David Whitebread, The Importance of Play: http://www.importanceofplay.eu/IMG/pdf/dr_david_whitebread_-_the_importance_of_play.pdf

Priority School Places for Poorer Pupils: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-28440869

Start School Later than age 5: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/10302249/Start-schooling-later-than-age-five-say-experts.html?fb

 

Gender Bias

Bilton, H. (2010) Outdoor Learning in the Early Years. London: Routledge.
Brandth, B. and Kvande, E. (1998) ‘Masculinity and child care: the reconstruction of fathering.’ Sociological Review, 46 (2).
Children’s Workforce Development Council (CWDC) (2009) Parents demand more male child care workers.Retrieved from: http//www.cwdcouncil.org.uk/press-releases/1591_.
Clensy, D. (2016) ‘Meet the men battling a big gender imbalance in early years education’ Bristol Post. Retrieved from: http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/8203-meet-men-battling-big-gender-imbalance-early/story-28784646-detail/story.html
Devarakonda, C. (2013) Diversity & Inclusion in Early Childhood. London: Sage Publications.
European Commission/EACEA/Eurydice/Eurostat, (2014). Key Data on Early Childhood Education and Care in Europe. 2014 Edition. Eurydice and Eurostat Report. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union.
Farquhar, S. (2006) Men at Work: Sexism in Early Childcare Education. New Zealand: Childforum Research Network.
Frederickson, N. and Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. London: OUP.
May, H. (2001) Politics in the Playground. Wellington: Bridget Williams Books.
Mistry, M. and Sood, K. (2013) ‘Under-representation of males in the early years: The challenges leaders face’. Management in Education. 27 (2) London: Sage Publications.
Nobel, C., Brown, J., and Murphy, J. (2001) How to Raise Boys’ Achievement. London: David Fulton Publications.
NHS (2015) General and Personal Medical Services in England 2005–2015. Provisional Experimental Statistics. UK.
Paton, G. (2009) ‘Parents demand more male nursery staff to act as role models’. Daily Telegraph, 20/01/2009.
Read, C. (2016) The Lost Boys: How boys are falling behind in their early years. London: Save the Children UK.
Solly, K. (2015) Risk, Challenge and Adventure in the Early Years. London: Routledge.

 

Importance of Group Play

BTEC Firsts Children’s Play, Learning and Development (2013) London: Pearson. Retrieved from: http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-firsts/childrens-play-learning-development-2012-nqf.html
Finch, C. Wirtanen, L. (2000) Children and Conflict: An Opportunity for Learning in the Early Childhood Classroom. NAEYC #8005
Marques, J., Pinto, I., Levine, J. and Abrams, D. (2016). ‘Membership role and subjective group dynamics: Impact on evaluative intragroup differentiation and commitment to prescriptive norms’. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, on-line. 19 (5)
Moreno, J. (1951) Sociometry, Experimental Method, and the Science of Society. Ambler, PA: Beacon House.
Moreno, J. (1953) ‘A Journal of Interpersonal Relations and Experimental Design’ Sociometry 18 (4).
Parten, M. (1932). ‘Social participation among preschool children’. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology.
Schutz, W. (1958). FIRO: A Three-Dimensional Theory of Interpersonal Behavior. New York, NY: Rinehart.
Wall, S., Litjens, I. and Taguma, M. (2015) Early Childhood Education and Care Pedagogy Review (England). OECD publication. Retrieved from: https://www.oecd.org/unitedkingdom/early-childhood-education-and-care-pedagogy-review-england.pdf

 

Fair Enough? Early Years Observation in the Spotlight
Bailey, K. (1978) Methods of Social Research. London: Collier-Macmillan.

Brodie, K. (2013) Observation, Assessment and Planning in the Early Years. London: OUP.

Capel, S., Leask, M. and Turner, T. (1995) Learning to Teach in the Secondary School. London: Routledge.

Cohen, L., and Mannion, L. (1995) Research Methods in Education. London: Routledge.

Frederickson, N. and Cline, T. (2009) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity. London: OUP.

Meighan, R. (1986) A Sociology of Educating. London: Cassell.

Sackett, D. L. (1979). ‘Bias in analytic research’. Journal of Chronic Diseases. 32 (1–2)

Solly, K. (2015) Risk, Challenge and Adventure in the Early Years. London: Routledge.

 

Why Bother? Early Years Assessment in Practice

Baker, C. (2006) Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

Brodie, K. (2013) Observation, Assessment and Planning in the Early Years. London: OUP.

Capel, S., Leask, M. and Turner, T. (1995) Learning to Teach in the Secondary School. London: Routledge.

Early Education, (2012) Development Matters in the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS). London: Early Education.

Guddemi, M. and Chase, B. (2004) Assessing Young Children. San Antonio, TX: Pearson Education.

Hornby, G. (1995) Working with Parents of Children with Special Needs. London: Cassell.

Standards and Testing Agency (2012) Assessments and Reporting Arrangements: Early Years Foundation Stage.

Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

The Science of Childcare Series: Cognitive Development

  1. Bronfenbrenner, U., (1979). The ecology of human development. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.
  2. Bruner, J. S. (1960). The Process of education. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.Fontana, D. (1988) Psychology for Teachers. London: Macmillan.
  3. Gopnik, A., Meltzoff, A., Kuhl, P., 1999. The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind. Morris: New York.
  4. Goswami, U. (2008) Byron Review on the Impact of New Technologies on Children: A Research Literature Review: Child Development. University of Cambridge
  5. Harvard University Centre on the Developing Child (2007) InBrief: The Science of Early Childhood Development http://developingchild.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/2007/03/InBrief-The-Science-of-Early-Childhood-Development2.pdf
  6. Kuzawa, C. et al (2014) ‘A Long Childhood Feeds the Hungry Human Brain’. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
  7. Murkoff, H. and Mazel, S. (1984) What to Expect When You’re Expecting. Workman Publishing.
  8. Piaget, J. (1967). The child’s conception of the world. Totowa, NJ: Littlefield, Adams.
  9. Rogoff, B. (1993). ‘Children’s guided participation and participatory appropriation in social activity.’
  10. In R. Wozniak & K Fischer (Eds.), Development in context: Acting and thinking in specific environments.Hillsdale, NJ: Earlbaum.
  11. Suskind, D., Suskind, B. and Lewinter-Suskind, L. Thirty Million Words: Building a Child’s Brain. Dutton, 2015.
  12. Vygotsky, L. (1978) Mind and Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  13. Vygotsky, L.S. (1981). ‘The genesis of higher mental functions’. In J.V. Wertsch (Ed.), The concept of activity in Soviet psychology. Armonk, NY: Sharpe
  14. Wood, D.J., Bruner, J.S. & Ross, G. (1976). ‘The role of tutoring in problem solving’. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 17.

 

Science of Childcare: Social and Emotional

References:
Bandura, A. (1977). Social Learning Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Bowlby, J. (1980). Attachment and Loss, Vol. 3: Loss: Sadness and Depression. New York: Basic Books.
Bulman, K. and Savory, L. (Eds.) (2006) BTEC First Children’s Care, Learning and Development: Student Book: Children’s Care Learning & Development. London: Heinemann.
Erikson, E.H. (1959). Identity and life styles: Selected papers. New York: International Universities Press.
Freud, S. (1910). ‘The origin and development of psychoanalysis’. American Journal of Psychology. 21.
Skinner, B. F. (1969). Contingencies of Reinforcement: A theoretical analysis. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.
Vygotsky, L.S. (1981). ‘The genesis of higher mental functions’. In J.V. Wertsch (Ed.), The concept of activity in Soviet psychology. Armonk, NY: Sharpe.